Removing: PGP Key and Content Licensing

I have removed two pages from my website—my PGP key and my content license.

PGP Key

I removed my public PGP key because I no longer intend to use it for signing messages. My same key remains on Keybase and other public key servers, but I no longer sign outgoing mail, nor do I intend to use my key regularly in any way.

I don’t feel that my key has been compromised. However, it does me little good to keep using it, and most encryption in actual use in my daily life doesn’t involve PGP. In the wake of a mostly minor vulnerability called E-Fail earlier this month—which didn’t impact me—I found myself persuaded of the ultimate futility of keeping up with PGP by an op-ed on Ars Technica from a couple of years ago.

Content Licensing

I removed my CC BY-NC 4.0 license notice page from my site. This post hereby serves as notice that from this date forward, I no longer license my existing or new content (writing, photos, videos, or audio) under a CC license, and so all that content falls back to the default copyright of the relevant jurisdiction.

Any works that have already been used under the CC license have been done so irrevocably, and so I have no ability to revoke those licenses. They may be licensed until their rights lapse under the copyright laws of those jurisdictions.

If anyone wants to use some of mine, they are certainly welcome. The removal of the license only implies one practical change—you must ask permission. That’s all.